NAJI ATTALLAH’S CREW: STEREOTYPES OF JEWS, ARABS, AND AMERICANS IN EGYPT’S MOST-­‐WATCHED RAMADAN 2012 SOAP OPERA

  • Amaya Martin University of Notre Dame, Indiana

Abstract

In addition to its strict fasting regiments, observed by practicing Muslims, the month of Ramadan has become known for its high viewership of serialized television programs throughout the Arabic-speaking world.  During Ramadan - a month during which millions partake of festive fast breaking (Iftaar) gatherings after sundown - competition among television stations pull all the stops to attract the largest audiences possible, often by offering compelling seasonal soap operas featuring major local and pan-Arab actors.




Author Biography

Amaya Martin, University of Notre Dame, Indiana

Amaya Martin is Assistant Teaching Professor in the Program of Arabic Language and Culture at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana. She previously worked in the Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies at Georgetown University, Washington, DC, where she earned her Ph.D. in Arabic. Amaya Martin’s academic interests include linguistic analysis of Arabic cultural and literary texts, especially works by or about minorities to discern the subtleties of their social status.



Published
2015-05-01
How to Cite
Martin, A. (2015). NAJI ATTALLAH’S CREW: STEREOTYPES OF JEWS, ARABS, AND AMERICANS IN EGYPT’S MOST-­‐WATCHED RAMADAN 2012 SOAP OPERA. The Levantine Review, 4(1), 8-22. https://doi.org/10.6017/lev.v4i1.8717
Section
Articles